Merle French Bulldog Guide

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Quick Jump

What is a Merle French Bulldog?

You may know the typical Frenchie colors like Fawn, Black, and Brindle… but have you heard of Merle Frenchies?

Merle Frenchies have the most unique coats– don’t believe me? Just look for yourself!

How to spot a Merle Frenchie

Merle Frenchies are easily distinguishable by their coats– random splotches of dark fur over a lighter base coat

Common Merle Colors

Common colors in Merle Frenchies include: tan, white, black, red, and blue.

  • Tan
  • White
  • Black
  • Red
  • Blue
  • (and more!)

What a Merle French Bulldog Looks Like

Here is a photo of a full-grown Merle French Bulldog:

Merle French Bulldog Traits

Commonly have: Bright blue eyes, dark brown eyes, tri-colored coat

Rarely have: Bi-color coat, odd-colored eyes

Types of Merle Frenchies

Merle can affect all coat colors, but these are some popular variations of the Merle coat.

Different Types of Merle Frenchies Explained

This video by Woodland Frenchies shows & explains the different types of Merle Frenchies better than I can… check it out!

How much are Merle French Bulldog Puppies?

A good breeder will not be cheap, but don’t overpay for a Frenchie

Unlike most dog breeds, Frenchies require to be artificially inseminated & undergo a c-section to give birth.

This means that you’re going to pay at least a couple thousand dollars for a well-bred Frenchie… did you know that the average cost to breed a Frenchie is $7,000!

Are Merle Frenchies Rare?

Yes! Merle Frenchies are one of the rarest French Bulldog colors, along with Blue, Blue Fawn, and Platinum.

How are Merle French Bulldogs Bred?

The merle pattern is produced when a dog has a single copy of the M allele.

All merle dogs have the genotype Mm — meaning they have one allele for merle and one allele for non-merle.

All non-merles are mm.

If you breed a merle (Mm) to a non-merle (mm) you will on average produce a litter in which a half of the puppies get the M allele so are Mm (merle) and half get the non-merle allele so are mm.

​ – dogster.com

Merle French Bulldog Health Problems

All Frenchies have a higher risk of health issues when compared to the average dog breed.

But Merle dogs — especially “double Merles” — are prone to even more problems!

Merle Frenchie Eye Problems

Read more about Merle coats & eye issues.

Merle Frenchie Deafness

Merle TypePrevalence of Unilateral DeafnessPrevalence of Bilateral Deafness
Single Merle2.7%0.9%
Double Merle10%15%

Source: pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19192156/

Regular Frenchie Health Issues

French Bulldogs in general (not just Merle) are prone to a whole bunch of health issues

Among Frenchies’ many health issues, joint problems are the most common.

  1. Joint problems: hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation, and arthritis.
  2. Breathing issues: stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, tracheal collapse
  3. Spinal issues: hemivertebrae, intervertebral disc disease, degenerative myelopathy
  4. Eye problems: cherry eye, cataracts, entropion (eyelid rolling inwards), and distichiasis (extra eyelash in abnormal location)
  5. Allergies

Frequently Asked Questions

Are Merle French Bulldogs Recognized by the AKC?

No, Merle Frenchies are not one of the official colors recognized by the AKC.

Therefore, you are unable to register your Merle Frenchie with the AKC.

Colors officially recognized by the AKC

These 8 colors are officially recognized by the AKC as an “official” French Bulldog color– any others aren’t officially considered a Frenchie to the AKC.

  1. Cream
  2. Fawn
  3. White
  4. Fawn & White
  5. Brindle
  6. White & Brindle
  7. Fawn Brindle
  8. Fawn Brindle & White

Are Merle Frenchies Purebred?

No, there is no such thing as a Purebred Merle Frenchie, as Purebred Frenchies don’t carry the Merle gene unless they’re bred with another breed.